Armenian Highland

Ծառը ինչքան բերք տայ ու բարի, գլուխն էնքան խոնարհ կը պահի:
However much fruit a tree bears, it humbles its head that much more.

նուռPomegranate 
The pomegranate, known as nour in Armenian. Is a fruit grown on either a shrub or a tree. It is a cultural symbol in Armenia along with apricots and grapes, It is very common in Armenia to drink the juice of the pomegranate, consume raw or to use in foods and there is even pomegranate wine. The nour has long been a symbol for fertility, abundance and marrige.
In ancient Armenia the bride would be given a pomegranate which she would throw against a wall and breaking it into peaces, the scattered seeds would ensure children. In Artsakh it was accepted to put pomegranates next to the bridal couple during the first night of the marriage. The symbol of the pomegranate is connected with insemination. It is believed the newlyweds enjoyed pomegranate wine, It protected a woman from infertility and protected a man’s virile strength. It is also a symbol for the nation, hapinnes and in general positivity. Armenian childerens fairy tales would usualy end, ”Three pomegranates fell down from heaven: One for the story teller, one for the listener, and one for the whole world.”
In Armenia it has been used for centuries in folk art, mythology, religious texts, literature and even in fashion. The famous Armenian painter Martiros Saryan used the pomegranate in many paintings and illustrated armenian mauscripts dating back to the sixth and seventh centuries depicts pomegranates, as a representation of the blood of Christ.The Color of Pomegranates (1968) is a movie directed by Sergei Parajanov. It is a biography of the Armenian ashug Sayat-Nova (King of Song) that attempts to reveal the poet’s life visually and poetically rather than literally.
Pomegranate juice, which contains vitamin C, folic acid, and antioxidants, is recommended for many illnesses. And Armenian pomegranate wine, famous for its semisweet taste, also holds many antioxidants, which may contribute to longevity. While most European languages have cognate names for the fruit, stemming from Latin granatum, exceptions are the Armenian term nur, Albanian term shega, Bulgarian and Azerbaijani nar and the Portuguese term romã which is derived from Arabic ruman, and has cognates in other Semitic languages (e.g. Hebrew rimmon) and Ancient Egyptian rmn.

նուռ
Pomegranate 

The pomegranate, known as nour in Armenian. Is a fruit grown on either a shrub or a tree. It is a cultural symbol in Armenia along with apricots and grapes, It is very common in Armenia to drink the juice of the pomegranate, consume raw or to use in foods and there is even pomegranate wine. The nour has long been a symbol for fertility, abundance and marrige.

In ancient Armenia the bride would be given a pomegranate which she would throw against a wall and breaking it into peaces, the scattered seeds would ensure children. In Artsakh it was accepted to put pomegranates next to the bridal couple during the first night of the marriage. The symbol of the pomegranate is connected with insemination. It is believed the newlyweds enjoyed pomegranate wine, It protected a woman from infertility and protected a man’s virile strength. 

It is also a symbol for the nation, hapinnes and in general positivity. Armenian childerens fairy tales would usualy end, ”Three pomegranates fell down from heaven: One for the story teller, one for the listener, and one for the whole world.”

In Armenia it has been used for centuries in folk art, mythology, religious texts, literature and even in fashion. The famous Armenian painter Martiros Saryan used the pomegranate in many paintings and illustrated armenian mauscripts dating back to the sixth and seventh centuries depicts pomegranates, as a representation of the blood of Christ.

The Color of Pomegranates (1968) is a movie directed by Sergei Parajanov. It is a biography of the Armenian ashug Sayat-Nova (King of Song) that attempts to reveal the poet’s life visually and poetically rather than literally.

Pomegranate juice, which contains vitamin C, folic acid, and antioxidants, is recommended for many illnesses. And Armenian pomegranate wine, famous for its semisweet taste, also holds many antioxidants, which may contribute to longevity. While most European languages have cognate names for the fruit, stemming from Latin granatum, exceptions are the Armenian term nur, Albanian term shega, Bulgarian and Azerbaijani nar and the Portuguese term romã which is derived from Arabic ruman, and has cognates in other Semitic languages (e.g. Hebrew rimmon) and Ancient Egyptian rmn.

  • 10 February 2014
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