Armenian Highland

Ծառը ինչքան բերք տայ ու բարի, գլուխն էնքան խոնարհ կը պահի:
However much fruit a tree bears, it humbles its head that much more.

Ghazanchetsots Cathedral ‘Ղազանչեցոց Եկեղեցի’ also known as the Cathedral of Christ the Holy Savior was completed in 1868 by Simon Ter-Hakobyan, 

The three images all show the same Armenian Apostolic Cathedral located in Artsakh, known as Nagorno-Karabakh internationally.All the images show the cathedral in very constrasting situations and circumstances.

The first Image shows the current state of the cathedral. Gracefully beautiful and in a time of peace. Open to all who wish to worship in it.

The second image is moments after the liberation of 
Shushi. A very emotional moment as it marked the victory and the liberation of Artsakh. The Armenians are dancing next the blown up cathedral that the Azeri forces used as a GRAD munitions storehouse. And before the Nagorno-Karabakh war, during the Soviet period, it was used as a granary, and then as a garage.

The third and final image shows the defiled and burnedCathedral of Christ the Holy Savior casting it’s shadow upon the razed, destroyed and ravaged Armenian quarter of Shushi. This was one in many pogroms targeted towards Armenians in Azerbaijan in 1920’s that claimed some sixty thousand civilian Armenian lifes.

"Even today I remember what I saw in Shusha in 1920, with horror. The most beautiful Armenian town was completely destroyed, and in the wells we saw corpses of women and children” - Grigory Ordzhonikidze

Armenian freedom fighter Pavel Manoukian patrolling the mountains of Artsakh. Dressed in traditional Armenian clothing.Manoukian participated in many bloody clashes during the Nagorno-Karabakh war, including the Liberation of Shushi.

Manuscripts from The Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia.

They are from the 12th century Cilician Armenia and are kept at the Mesrop Mashtots Institute of Ancient Manuscripts.

More commonly known as the Matenadaran. It holds one of the worlds most richest collection of ancient and medieval manuscripts and books. The books and manuscript contets ranges from history, philosophy, geography, science, medicine, litterature, cosmography and much more.

“The writer is a spiritual anarchist, as in the depth of his soul every man is. He is discontented with everything and everybody. The writer is everybody’s best friend and only true enemy — the good and great enemy. He neither walks with the multitude nor cheers with them. The writer who is a writer is a rebel who never stops”

—   William Saroyan
An Armenian Woman Charles-Landelle (1821-1908)

An Armenian Woman

Charles-Landelle (1821-1908)

Vishapakar ‘Վիշապաքար’ on Mount Aragats
Vishapakars are dotted all across Armenia and the name translates to Dragon stone. It is the Armenian name for the Menhir which are also found in Scottland, Ireland, France, England and other European countries. Mostly where there has been a Celtic presence.
They are also spread across the historical provinces of Armenia such as Javakhk, Tayk, Taron, Van and so forth. the Vishapakars are tall cigar shaped megaliths and can usualy be found high on mountains near rivers and lakes, Said to be a warning to travels of the dragons that may be lurking nearby the water. The oldest of these type of Vishapakars are from around second millennium BC and give an incredible insight of the Armenian prehistoric tribes.Many of them are carved as a fish although having a bulls head and feet carved into them, sometimes there is a stream of water flowing from the bulls mouth.
There are many different theories about the meanings of Vishapakars. One theory holds that these monuments represent mythological dragons gaurding the water (B. Piotrovski) Other theories trace back the megagaliths to Astghik, the Armenian Goddess of fertility, love and also water sources and springs. (M. Abeghian) Another theory says it comes from a shared Indo-European legend. It speaks about the God of thunder and his foe the serpent. The victory of the Thunder God results in the origination of the cosmic waters (rain, seas, rivers) The Dragon Stones have certain aspects that may be related to this. The huge fish would represent the water serpent. The bull is the symbol for the thunder God in many cultures such as the Hurrian, Hittite, Greek and Armenian. The wavy lines below the bull’s head may be interpreted as rainy waters triggered by the battle between the god and the serpent.Armenian paganism included a great deal of serpents and dragons, usualy depicted as evil creatures. One example is a legend talks about how Satenik, who was the wife of Artaxias I King of Armenia in 190 BC, left Artaxias for Argavan, a descendant of a race of dragons.

Vishapakar ‘Վիշապաքար’ on Mount Aragats

Vishapakars are dotted all across Armenia and the name translates to Dragon stone. It is the Armenian name for the Menhir which are also found in Scottland, Ireland, France, England and other European countries. Mostly where there has been a Celtic presence.

They are also spread across the historical provinces of Armenia such as Javakhk, Tayk, Taron, Van and so forth. the Vishapakars are tall cigar shaped megaliths and can usualy be found high on mountains near rivers and lakes, Said to be a warning to travels of the dragons that may be lurking nearby the water. The oldest of these type of Vishapakars are from around second millennium BC and give an incredible insight of the Armenian prehistoric tribes.

Many of them are carved as a fish although having a bulls head and feet carved into them, sometimes there is a stream of water flowing from the bulls mouth.

There are many different theories about the meanings of Vishapakars. One theory holds that these monuments represent mythological dragons gaurding the water (B. Piotrovski) Other theories trace back the megagaliths to Astghik, the Armenian Goddess of fertility, love and also water sources and springs. (M. Abeghian) 

Another theory says it comes from a shared Indo-European legend. It speaks about the God of thunder and his foe the serpent. The victory of the Thunder God results in the origination of the cosmic waters (rain, seas, rivers) The Dragon Stones have certain aspects that may be related to this. The huge fish would represent the water serpent. The bull is the symbol for the thunder God in many cultures such as the Hurrian, Hittite, Greek and Armenian. The wavy lines below the bull’s head may be interpreted as rainy waters triggered by the battle between the god and the serpent.

Armenian paganism included a great deal of serpents and dragons, usualy depicted as evil creatures. One example is a legend talks about how Satenik, who was the wife of Artaxias I King of Armenia in 190 BC, left Artaxias for Argavan, a descendant of a race of dragons.

Coin of Tigranes V of Armenia (ca AD 6-16)Left bust of Tigranes V.Right, Vahagn holding club set on ground and lion skin.
Eleftheria Arvanitaki - Meno Ektos

Eleftheria Arvanitaki sings about Armenia

English translation;

I still remain an outcast.
I remember names.
I run at the speed of light.

I still remain an outcast,
like some voiceless mouths.
that a lotus drove out of this world.

In my bachelor evenings,
I sing armenian songs.
I want to go back,
but my paradise is closed.

In my bachelor evenings,
I sing armenian songs.
I want to go back,
but my homeland is erased.

I still remain an outcast.
My speech is made of vibrating chords.
I’m poised in silence like an eagle.

I still remain an outcast,
like some shapes,
written on the sand by a believer.

In my bachelor evenings,
I sing armenian songs.
I want to go back,
but my paradise is closed.

In my bachelor evenings,
I sing armenian songs.
I want to go back,
but my homeland is erased.

In my bachelor evenings,
I sing armenian songs.
I want to go back,
but my paradise is closed.

In my bachelor evenings,
I sing armenian songs.
I want to go back,
but my homeland is erased.

Queen Zabel’s return to the throne,(Isabella, Queen of Armenia)
Վարդգես ՍուրենյանցVardges Sureniants

“Turkey is taking advantage of the war in order to thoroughly liquidate (grundlich aufzaumen) its internal foes, i.e., the indigenous Christians, without being thereby disturbed by foreign intervention. What on earth do you want? The question is settled. There are no more Armenians.”

—   Talat Pasha  ’In a conversation with Dr. Mordtmann of the German Embassy’